Tim was browsing through some stored procedures on an application he was working on and came across this ...

CREATE PROCEDURE SelectVendors AS
  BEGIN
   SELECT vendorNum, vendorType, vendorDept, inactiveDate
   FROM Vendors
   WHERE inactiveDate IS NULL
   ORDER BY vendorNum

   SELECT vendorNum, vendorType, vendorDept, inactiveDate
   FROM Vendors
   WHERE inactiveDate IS NOT NULL
   ORDER BY vendorNum
 END

Natrually, his first reaction wasn't "WTF", but more along the lines of "okaaaayy ..." After all, maybe the data layer does something different with active and inactive vendors, right? A search for the procedure name found a single function accessing it ...

Tim was browsing through some stored procedures on an application he was working on and came across this ...

private ArrayList GetVendors()
{
  SqlConnection myConn = getConnection();
  SqlCommand myCommand = new SqlCommand("SelectVendors", myConn);
  myCommand.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;

  myConn.Open();      
  SqlDataReader myReader = myCommand.ExecuteReader();

  ArrayList myVendorList = new ArrayList();

  while(myReader.Read())
  { 
    Vendor myVendor = new Vendor();
    myVendor.Number = myReader.GetInt32(0);
    myVendor.Type = myReader.GetString(1);
    myVendor.Deptartment = myReader.GetInt32(2);
          
    if (myReader.IsDBNull(3))
      myVendor.InactiveDate = SqlDateTime.Null;
    else
      myVendor.InactiveDate  = myReader.GetDateTime(3);
          
    myVendorList.Add(myVendor);
  }

  myReader.NextResult();

  while(myReader.Read())
  {
    Vendor myVendor = new Vendor();
    myVendor.Number = myReader.GetInt32(0);
    myVendor.Type = myReader.GetString(1);
    myVendor.Deptartment = myReader.GetInt32(2);
          
    if (myReader.IsDBNull(3))
      myVendor.InactiveDate = SqlDateTime.Null;
    else
      myVendor.InactiveDate  = myReader.GetDateTime(3);
          
    myVendorList.Add(myVendor);
  }

  myReader.Close();
  myConn.Close();

  return myVendorList;
}

And that, right there, is enough for the WTF reaction. Unless, of course, anyone can think of a reason for creating two results sets only to combine them in the data layer and, in another data layer function, sort them ...